The Blessed Virgin Mary and the color blue

I’ve had the opportunities to talk to people, especially to none Catholics about Catholic worship. Our liturgy has a lot of signs and symbols, and it is very important that you understand these signs and symbols to flow with us. Lack of proper understanding of these sings and symbols sometimes lead to unnecessary criticism of Catholicism.

At a point during our celebration of the Holy Mass for instance, we offer each other the sign of peace. This sign may differ according to regions, but in Nigeria and many other parts of the world it is by hand shake. It is a sign, but a sign of some thing very important, reconciliation. We are reminded at that point that offering gifts to God without sincere reconciliation with those we may not be in good terms with is a wast of time.

The color blue associated with the Blessed Virgin Mary by the Catholic Church is also a sign of something you need to know. I stumbled at the article below  first published by Aleteia, and I feel its worth sharing; enjoy your reading.

When viewing Christian art from the past thousand years or so, there is one color that is almost always associated with the Blessed Virgin Mary: blue.

Why is that? What significance does it have?

To start off, the color blue has deep biblical roots in the Old Testament. According to Dr. R. Jared Staudt, the color is specifically mentioned as the color of the people of Israel in the book of Numbers.

Speak to the people of Israel, and bid them to make tassels on the corners of their garments throughout their generations, and to put upon the tassel of each corner a cord of blue; and it shall be to you a tassel to look upon and remember all the commandments of the Lord, to do them, not to follow after your own heart and your own eyes, which you are inclined to go after wantonly. (Numbers 15:38-39)

For the people of Israel blue brings to mind the following of God’s Commandments, as opposed to a person’s selfish will.

This was perfectly lived out by the Blessed Mother who said, “Behold, I am the handmaid of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word” (Luke 1:38). She was the faithful “Daughter of Zion” who fulfilled the call of obedience that God had asked of the Israelites.

Additionally, Numbers indicated that “the Levites are to ‘spread over [the Ark of the Covenant] a cloth all of blue’ (4:6). And further: ‘And over the table of the bread of the Presence they shall spread a cloth of blue’ (4:7).”

Mary is traditionally referred to as the new Ark of the Covenant, as she held within herself the Divine Presence of God.

On the other hand, the Byzantine/Orthodox tradition of clothing Mary in blue has a different meaning.

Blue in iconography represents transcendence, mystery, and the divine. It is the color of the sky and as a result is viewed as a heavenly color.

Red in contrast is seen as an earthly color, the color of blood.

Jesus is typically depicted in icons with a blue outer garment and a red inner garment, symbolizing how divinity wraps his humanity.

Mary on the other hand is seen with a red outer garment and a blue inner garment, representing how she carried divinity (Jesus) within her humanity.

When Mary appeared to Saint Juan Diego, she wore a blue-green mantel. According to the Knights of Columbus, “the star-speckled green-blue mantle symbolizes the heavens. In addition, the mantle’s color indicates her royalty, since only the native emperors could wear cloaks of that color.”

So blue is a very important color in the artistic traditions of Christianity and has deep spiritual meanings that bring out different attributes of the Blessed Mother. It is a sacred color, one that reminds us of Mary’s faithfulness and her privileged role in salvation history.

Courtesy: Aleteia

Rev. Fr. Joel Okojie OSA

Joel Okojie is an ordained Catholic Priest in the Order of St. Augustine. He has been a Priest for over a decade. He served as pastor in two different parishes, he was one time Novice Master and a member of the Provincial Council of the province of St. Augustine of Nigeria, and he is currently on a mission in response to the needs of the Church in Canada.

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